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Asia Studies Program (1964-) | Carleton College Archives

Name: Asia Studies Program (1964-)


Historical Note:

Asia Studies Program:  1964/65

During the 1964/65 academic year Carleton inaugurated a new program in Asian Studies, financed by grants from the Hill Family Foundation of St. Paul, Minnesota, and the McGregor Fund of Detroit.  Courses dealing with Asia and with Asian materials are regularly offered in several departments (art, economics, government, history, and religion, among others), and a special faculty committee is in charge of arrangements for a wide variety of special programs and activities.  These have included recitals by a troupe of Indian musicians and a Japanese dancer, a lecture-demonstration by a Japanese artist, several lectures on international affairs and the Far East, the two-week visit of a distinguished Buddhist monk and scholar, exhibitions and gallery talks on Oriental art, and a symposium on “Modern Japan” in which a number of outstanding authorities and artists participated.

The purpose of the Asian Studies program at Carleton is to heighten awareness of the richness and diversity of Asian culture, and to increase their understanding of social and political issues in the Orient.  It thereby serves the purpose of liberal education as a process by which individuals come to understand their own culture and values by recognizing their identity with and differences from other cultures and values.  As the program develops further, increased opportunities will be made available for students and faculty to participate in intensive programs of study in the Asian field at other institutions, to travel to Asia for purposes of study and research, and to supplement in other ways such experiences as are already a part of the program on the campus itself.

A small group of students will go to Japan during the summer of 1965 in a study-travel seminar under the direction of Dr. Tetsuo Najita of the Department of History.  During their time in Japan they will spend several weeks at Doshisha University in Kyoto, where the College has for a number of years carried on the “Carleton-in-Japan” program described on page 133.  [from  1964/65 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

Chinese Established: 1987/88

1974/75: Chinese:  Courses in the Chinese language (Mandarin) at St. Olaf are open to Carleton students.  [from  1974/75 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1987/88: Chinese:  Elementary Chinese (3 terms)  [from 1987/88 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1988/89:  Chinese:  Elementary Chinese (3 terms), Intermediate Chinese (2 terms)  [from 1988/89 Carleton College Bulletins (Catalogs)]

Japanese Established:  1971/72

1971/72:  Japanese:  Elementary Japanese (3 terms), Intermediate Japanese (3 terms)  [from Carleton College Bulletins (Catalogs)]

 

Japanese Garden Established:  1974-76

The design of the garden, as well as its construction, was accomplished by David Slawson between 1974 and 1976. Dr. Slawson, who received his doctorate in Japanese literature and aesthetics from Indiana University, studied for two years in Kyoto with Kinsaku Nakane, one of Japan's foremost garden designers. (Responding to plans of the Carleton garden, Professor Nakane wrote jubilantly to Slawson: "You have equipped yourself with an  ability more excellent than that of any of my Japanese disciples.") Slawson regards the landscape garden as an art form. Its meaning, if there is one, is to be experienced. The curving shoreline of the dry lake, with its coves and expanses, may be likened to the Japanese character meaning 'heart,' but the design of the garden draws the viewer into its solitude, to contemplate the heart within.  [from  website: http://apps.carleton.edu/campus/japanesegarden/]

Fengyang Involvement:  I believe you are referring to the Carleton Mission in Fenchow [Fenzhou] in Shansi [Shanxi] province:  1903-1948

See attached pdf file Guide to the Carleton-in-China Collection by Eric Hillemann.

Doshisha Involvement:  1954-Current

After 1950, Carleton-in-China reconstituted itself into Carleton Abroad (1950/51) and then  Carleton- in- Japan (1956/57)Carleton-in-Japan then became the Carleton-Doshisha Fellowship  in 1965/66, and later, the Year-in-Kyoto Program (1972/73) in cooperation with Amherst, Connecticut, and Williams Colleges and Wesleyan University.  Its current iteration is The Associated Kyoto Program.

1951/52:  Carleton Abroad:  Faculty and students of Carleton College have contributed annually, through the Carleton Service Fund, to the support of education work abroad.  This is done by sending an outstanding and carefully selected member of the graduating class to serve as a teacher, normally for a two-year term.  The current representative teaches at Baika Girls’ School, near Osaka, Japan.  [from 1951/52 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1954/55: Carleton Abroad:  Faculty and students of Carleton College have contributed annually, through the Carleton Service Fund, to the support of education work abroad.  This is done by sending an outstanding and carefully selected member of the graduating class to serve as a teacher, normally for a two-year term.  The current representative teaches at Iwakura High School, Kyoto, Japan.  [from  1954/55 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1956/57:  Carleton-In-Japan:  The College contributes to international understanding by sending one member of every other graduating class to teach in Japan, normally for two years.  The current representative teaches at Iwakura High School, one of a number of schools and colleges comprising The Doshisha, an educational center in Kyoto, Japan.  Following the term of service in Japan, each emissary returns for a period of residence on the campus to interpret his experience to the college community.  The Carleton Service Fund, subscribed by Carleton students and faculty, supports the financial operation of this program.  [from  1956/57 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1965-66:  Carleton-Doshisha Fellowship is a one-year study fellowship at the Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan.  One Carleton graduate is awarded this fellowship each year.  The Fellow pursues intensive independent study of some are of Asian culture and of the Japanese language.  He lives with several Doshisha undergraduates in Carleton House and usually participates in Doshisha extra-curricular activities, such as the English-Speaking Society.  The 1966-67 Fellowship is supported in part by College funds and in part by contributions to the Carleton Service Fund; it is administered by a student-faculty committee as part of the Asian Studies program.  [from  1965/66 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

1972/73:  Carleton, in cooperation with Amherst, Connecticut, and Williams Colleges and Wesleyan University, sponsors the Year-in-Kyoto Program which takes 20 students and one faculty member to Japan for an academic year.  [from  1972/73 Carleton College Bulletin (Catalog)]

2011:  The Associated Kyoto Program is a two-semester study abroad program at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, sponsored by a consortium of fifteen American colleges and universities. The Program maintains high academic standards and dedication to a sound liberal education for which its sponsoring institutions are known. Approximately 40 students are accepted each year to study the Japanese language intensively and take courses in English on Japan, mainly in the humanities and social sciences. The sponsoring institutions are: Amherst College, Bates College, Bucknell University, Carleton College, Colby College, Connecticut College, Middlebury College, Mount Holyoke College, Oberlin College, Pomona College, Smith College, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, Williams College, and Whitman College. Occasionally students from other colleges are admitted. Almost 1300 students have participated in the Program since its inception in 1972.  [from  website:  http://www.associatedkyotoprogram.org/welcome/theakp.html]




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